The Unjust, Irrational, and Unconstitutional Consequences of Pedophilia Panic

Writing in the April online edition of Reason magazine, Jacob Sullom, takes on the irrationality that exists in our nation’s sex offender laws. In his wide-ranging essay, Sullom writes that public fear and disgust lead to strange and uneven outcomes in sex offenses involving minors. Under federal law…looking at child pornography can be punished asContinue reading “The Unjust, Irrational, and Unconstitutional Consequences of Pedophilia Panic”

NY Times questions "frightening and high" sex offender recidivism rates

Writing in the New York Times, Adam Liptak calls the long-standing, and discredited, popular myth of “frightening and high” sex offender recidivism rates “dubious.” That myth was used by a lawyer for North Carolina in an argument before the U.S. Supreme Court supporting that state’s law banning registered citizens from many popular social media sites.Continue reading “NY Times questions "frightening and high" sex offender recidivism rates”

Analysis: Justices skeptical of social media restrictions for sex offenders

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in the case of Packingham v. North Carolina, a challenge to a North Carolina law that prohibits registered sex offenders from accessing social media sites including Facebook and Twitter. Amy Howe, at scotusblog.com, writes that many of the Justices appeared skeptical of the law. Justice Elena Kagan suggested thatContinue reading “Analysis: Justices skeptical of social media restrictions for sex offenders”