Nebraska Story #2: Trevor


Nebraska undercuts those trying to live better lives.

  • Law should recognize extreme situations.
  • Even when he succeeds, Nebraska finds a way to make him fail.

This is a series of Nebraska stories about life on the registry. All names have been changed, even when the registrant said we could use his or her name. Some details may be changed to protect the people in the stories but the laws that cause so much grief are very real.


Trevor lived alone, a triumph after the difficulty he had finding a job and housing while on the registry.

In the spring of 2019, his home flooded in the extreme flooding event confronting much of Nebraska, and he had to evacuate immediately. The law required him to notify the sheriff of his move within three days before moving but he had no choice.

Not only was Trevor not able to notify the sheriff before his move, but flooded roads and washed-out bridges made it impossible for him even to reach the sheriff’s office.


Download The Perfect Bad Law


Nebraska registry laws make no accommodation for extreme situations like this. No matter what the reason for a move—divorce, domestic violence, flood, fire—Nebraska should not put people at risk of a felony because of a sudden change of address.

When someone is trying to live a better life, Nebraska should let him do that without forever having the threat of a felony over his head.

Scamming Scum Might Call You, and You Should Just Hang Up

SCAMMER ALERT

  • Do not send money under threat
  • Law enforcement does not work this way
  • Scamming scum is trying to scare you – be FEARLESS!
  • Even if the number looks official, IT ISN’T
  • They DO NOT have a warrant for your arrest

If you get a phone call from “law enforcement” that has to do with your registry status, do not provide any information. It’s probably NOT law enforcement. Assume it is a scam, no matter how sure the caller sounds. The caller will sound official and they will know quite a bit about you. They got their information from the registry. 

Be patient. Let them talk; they may threaten to come arrest you. When they ask for money, you can be sure it is a scam.You can simply hang up. There is no need to argue with them or converse with them at all at this point.


Some scammers will tell you that you are under phone surveillance and that you are not allowed to hang up. HANG UP ANYWAY. That is not something that law enforcement will do. Scammers do not want you to hang up and call the real cops. They want you to be afraid and they can make sure you are afraid by continuing to tell you how much trouble you are in.

Scammers like to operate after hours or on weekends when it will be difficult for you to reach someone at the law enforcement agency for verification.

Some scammers ask you to purchase a Visa gift card for a specific amount and then tell you to meet them somewhere to deliver the money. DO NOT DO THIS.

Law enforcement does not work this way. Some scammers want to be paid through PayPal. Law enforcement does not work this way, either. Scammers can and will “spoof” a law enforcement phone number so that caller ID may indicate a legitimate call from that agency. It isn’t. 

Scammers will tell you they have a warrant for your arrest. They don’t. 

Scammers will use the name of someone who actually works at the law enforcement agency so that when you google the caller’s name, you will believe it is a legitimate call. It isn’t.


Remember: If law enforcement has a warrant for your arrest, they are not going to call and tell you that. 

Nebraska Story #1: William

The registry never gets better, even when the people listed on it do.

How do you succeed when the state is working to make you fail?

  • The registry leads to homelessness, joblessness and punishes families.
  • William’s determination to become a better person was undermined by the law.
  • Only a few registrants can ever be removed from the list.

This is a series of Nebraska stories about life on the registry. All names have been changed, even when the registrant said we could use his or her name. Some details may be changed to protect the people in the stories but the laws that cause so much grief are very real.


William had lived successfully on the registry for years.

He was a good support for other people learning to deal with the public humiliation of being on the registry. He rebuilt his life after prison with humility and a quiet determination to be a better person.

When his employer reluctantly laid him off because of changes in the economy, he lost his apartment and moved into his parents’ home.


Download The Perfect Bad Law


Finding a new job took time because too many employers refuse to hire registrants. Finding a new apartment was difficult for the same reason.

People change over time but the registry doesn’t recognize that change. Only a small number of registrants can be removed from the list early, and some can never be removed.

The registry never gets better even when the people listed there do.